La Salle’s Dream Run Continues To Sweet 16

By Joseph Santoliquito

PHILADELPHIA (CBS)—It’s the little things that tend to resonate. Especially in March. Especially when you’ve come this far, as La Salle has during this NCAA Tournament, breaking through a decade’s long threshold that’s spanned back to the late-1980s without winning a tournament game.

But the fatigue of travel and playing three games in five days was bound to take a toll. Or so you would think.

It didn’t.

Thanks to the “Southwest Philly floater.”

Against longer, larger Mississippi, the smaller, faster Explorers battled stubbornly, and a slashing Tyrone Garland sliced through a little sliver of daylight and won it on a layup with 2.5 seconds left, giving the Explorers a dramatic 76-74 victory at the Sprint Center, in Kansas City, Missouri.

The victory continues an amazing, improbable journey for the No. 13-seed Explorers, who improved to 24-9, and will advance to play surprising No. 9 seed Wichita State, upset winners over West bracket No. 1 seed Gonzaga, in the Sweet 16 on Thursday night in Los Angeles.

The three NCAA Tournament victories are the most by a La Salle team since Tom Gola led the Explorers to the NCAA finals in 1955.

La Salle’s Ramon Galloway finished with a game-high 24 points on 8 for 13 shooting, followed by a strong performance by Tyreek Duren, who had 19, including two critical free throws with 1:07 to play that tied the game at 74-74.

Then there was Garland, who was exceptional in the Explorers’ open-round victory over Boise State, and followed that performance up by scoring 17 on 6-for-16 shooting against Mississippi.

Including a shot Garland is sure to remember for the rest of his life.

After La Salle’s defense clamped down on Mississippi, forcing the Rebels to turn the ball over on a shot-clock violation, the Explorers had a chance to win it with :31.8 seconds left in the game and the length of the court to go.

Mississippi, for some reason, did not pressure the ball and sat back in a 2-3 zone. Duren patiently waited as he crossed halfcourt, again, with no one from Mississippi pressuring the ball. As time wound down, Duren passed it Garland with just under six seconds to play.

Garland drove the lane, accelerated through the Rebels zone and attacked Mississippi’s 6-foot-9 Reginald Buckner, switching hands and tossing a shot that banked off the glass, hung tantalizingly on the rim, before finally falling.

Mississippi’s last-gasp, three-quarters court heave didn’t come close.

As the final buzzer sounded, Galloway fell to the floor, shaking his head in disbelief. Explorers coach John Giannini looked up into the rafters, possibly reassuring himself what he saw actually happened, and then there was Garland, mobbed by his teammates, mugging for the cameras.

Just when it seemed the enervated Explorers didn’t appear to have another gear, just when it seemed their run would end, down, 69-64, with 4:19 left after a Buckner basket, La Salle still managed to find a way.

Leaving Garland to play the role of hero.

“We just spread them out against their zone and our guards are so quick,” said Giannini, who became the first coach in NCAA Tournament history to go 3-0 as a No. 13 seed or lower. “There was plenty of space, and no one is quicker than Tyrone. He’s as quick as anyone in the country. We couldn’t be more proud. We spoke all week about the great La Salle tradition, and these guys are doing it right before our eyes.”

Garland wanted the ball.

“That was the Southwest Philly floater,” a beaming Garland said about the winning shot.

With Temple and Villanova knocked out of the tournament, La Salle has now won 10 of its last 13 games and remains the only show in town–and the toast of the town.

Prosecution Rests Case In Rutgers Webcam Spying Trial

NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (CBSNewYork/AP) -- Prosecutors have rested their case in the trial of a former Rutgers student accused of using a webcam to spy on his roommate's intimate encounter with another man. Lawyers for Dharun Ravi are expected to present an investigator and several character witnesses starting Friday. They'll also have to decide whether Ravi will take the stand. If he testifies, it won't be until at least Monday. Ravi, now 20, is charged with 15 criminal counts, including invasion of privacy, bias intimidation and several crimes related to trying to cover up his actions. His roommate, 18-year-old Tyler Clementi, committed suicide on Sept. 22, 2010, just days after the alleged spying and one day after what prosecutors say was an attempt to spy on him again. Ravi is not charged with Clementi's death, though in many ways the suicide lies at the heart of the case. The prosecution has called about 20 witnesses so far in ten days of testimony. On Wednesday, they put on the witness stand a detective who interviewed Ravi on Sept. 23, 2010 after Clementi was believed dead but before Ravi was charged. Jurors saw the nearly hour-long video of the interrogation. Police asked Ravi about his use of the webcam to allegedly spy on Clementi during his romantic encounter with another man. The investigator, Michael Daniewicz, repeatedly accused Ravi of lying about details. And Ravi, for his part, agreed that he had violated his roommate's privacy by going to a friend's room and using her computer to view images from his own webcam, which he had set up to accept webchat requests automatically. Investigator: "Is it safe to say you were invading his privacy?" Ravi: "It is my room also." Investigator: "Did you violate this man's privacy?" Ravi: "Yes." He said he did not see anything graphic and turned the stream off as soon as he realized what was going on. "I didn't realize it was something so private,'' he said. "It was my room, too.'' He said he sent a Twitter post about what he saw, later, "daring'' people to videochat with him two days later during the hours when Clementi had requested the room again. But he said that he didn't mean it. "I said that sarcastically, first of all,'' he said, continuing that he did not want people to watch the feed. Jurors had heard in earlier testimony, though, that Clementi visited Ravi's Twitter page 38 times in the two days before he killed himself and saved a screenshot of that tweet. But Ravi said in the interview that he took steps to keep others from viewing the second dorm-room liaison. "And I turned off my computer,'' he said. "I put it to sleep.'' "Regardless of what I said my computer wasn't accessible,'' he said. Ravi explained that he was also joking when he texted a friend that other Rutgers students were having a "viewing party'' to watch the stream. Ravi said he wanted to protect his roommate. "I'm not trying to hero myself,'' he told the officer. Clementi's mother tried to hold back tears as the video was played for jurors in court. Ravi was arrested days after the interview and has pleaded not guilty to the charges against him, saying he was using the webcam to keep an eye on his belongings. Share your thoughts in the comments section… (TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2012 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)