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Residents Concerned Netting At South Amboy Park Is Responsible For Killing Birds

Netting Manufacturer Looking Into The Problem

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SOUTH AMBOY, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Netting at one New Jersey park is supposed to keep birds out of gazebos. But instead, the birds are finding themselves trapped and eventually dying.

As CBS 2′s Christine Sloan reported Tuesday, the county that runs the park is aware and is trying to find a way to correct the problem.

Netting under gazebos at the Raritan Bay Waterfront Park in South Amboy is meant to keep birds from getting in and nesting.

“They felt there was a problem from droppings in the gazebo. People were complaining, so they put this net together and didn’t think it would be a problem,” a concerned resident named “Deborah” told Sloan.

But it has become a problem. One couple said the netting has led to the deaths of dozens of birds.

Sloan reported seeing birds making their way in and getting trapped in a space between the net and the roof of the gazebo.

“The birds are getting in and they can’t get out so they’re flying into the netting and falling to the bottom of the nets and they’re just panicking and I think they’re just starving to death,” Deborah told Sloan.

The Middlesex County Department of Parks and Recreation said they found out about the holes in the netting several weeks ago and have reached out to the manufacturer to see what can be done to correct the problem.

“The engineering department is now having the contractor who put the netting up come and check because we couldn’t find any spaces where these birds were sneaking into the netting,” Middlesex Parks Department director Ralph Albanir told Sloan.

But Sloan reported she was able to find several spots.

The couple, who did not want their last name used, said they complained to a park ranger and since have seen dead birds on at least three occasions.

“Take another look at it, re-examine it and try to come up with a solution,” a man named “Ben” told Sloan.

He said he hopes the Parks Department comes up with a way to let the bird co-exist with park goers at the waterfront spot.

CBS 2 has not heard back from the company that installs the netting to see what solution it has come up with.

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