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Improved Service Coming To G Train Following Review

Changes Contingent On Approval Of Funding By MTA
St. Sen. Daniel Squadron announces better service coming to the G train, July 15, 2013. (credit: Alex Silverman/WCBS 880)

St. Sen. Daniel Squadron announces better service coming to the G train, July 15, 2013. (credit: Alex Silverman/WCBS 880)

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – There’s some relief coming for subway riders who depend on the G train to move between Queens and Brooklyn.

“I stand and I stand and A and C trains fly behind me while I’m waiting for the G,” frustrated straphanger Tolani Adeboye told WCBS 880’s Alex Silverman.

Once the G train does arrive, Adeboye said the next step is the so-called “G Train Sprint,” since riders said they never know where the four cars will stop.

“Booking it down the platform,” she told Silverman.

“They’re going to change the stations so you know where the trains are stopping,” State Sen. Daniel Squadron (D-Manhattan) announced on Monday.

He and another state lawmaker, Martin Malavé Dilan (D-Brooklyn), urged the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to study the subway line to identify areas for improvement.

“Today, G means great news for G train riders,” said Squadron. “The great news is there are going to be more G trains, contingent on funding, starting at the end of this year.”

The afternoon rush will feature 25 percent more trains at more regular intervals, the MTA announced.

“You’re not going to be sitting, waiting, waiting, waiting and then two come,” said Squadron.

“It’s going to make such a huge difference for me, for my colleagues and for my community,” a commuter told Silverman.

The review began in January and wrapped up last week, with the MTA announcing its recommendations for improvements.

The changes will come pending the approval of $700,000 in funding.

“The G line is a vital connection for customers in fast-growing parts of our service area, and this review will be an important tool for making both short-term improvements and long-term additions to our service. We are pleased to be able to take these steps to improve service for all of our G train customers,” said MTA Chairman and CEO Thomas F. Prendergast in a statement.

The northern section of the G line was badly damaged in superstorm Sandy and has been undergoing a massive restoration project to remove and replace damaged equipment.

The project requires the G line to be shut down for 12 weekends this year and for five weeks next summer.

The 11.4-mile line makes 21 stops through parts of Queens and Brooklyn.

The G is the only subway line that does not enter Manhattan. It serves the booming neighborhoods of Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, Williamsburg and Greenpoint in Brooklyn, as well as Long Island City in Queens.

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