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Quinn: ‘The Court Is Wrong’ For Blocking Prevailing Wage Law

Measure Went To Court After Bloomberg Sued When His Veto Was Overruled
Mayor Michael Bloomberg (L), Speaker Christine Quinn (R) (credit: Getty Images)

Mayor Michael Bloomberg (L), Speaker Christine Quinn (R) (credit: Getty Images)

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) – Speaker Christine Quinn says the City Council will appeal a judge’s decision to block New York City’s “prevailing wage” law.

The law passed last year sets pay for some building-service workers at more than $20 an hour.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg sued the City Council after it overrode his veto.

The judge said Monday the state’s minimum wage law trumps the bill. The city’s current minimum wage is $7.25 an hour.

“The court found that the law was pre-empted by state laws. We strongly disagree, we knew that argument might be raised from day one, we’re prepared for it. With all due respect, the court is wrong,” said Quinn.

Bloomberg believes the bill discourages companies from doing business in the city. It would impact businesses that get significant space or subsidies from the city.

The bill has the support of the city’s largest building service workers union. That union has endorsed Quinn for mayor.

“No court setback is going to stop us in our fight for middle class New Yorkers. We’re going to use every possible legal tool at our disposal to win this case and bring the prevailing wage law into full implementation,” Quinn said on Tuesday. “Make no mistake, we will appeal and we will be victorious in our efforts to make sure that the council’s law is the law of the city of New York moving forward.”

The mayor’s office has called the council’s bill “ill-conceived” and said it threatens important job-creating projects.

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