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Study: Suffolk County’s Route 25 Most Dangerous Road For Pedestrians In Tri-State Area

A sign stands at a crosswalk in New York (Photo credit: EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)

A sign stands at a crosswalk in New York (Photo credit: EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/Getty Images)

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – A transportation group has released its list of the Tri-State area’s most dangerous roads for walking.

The Tri-State Transportation Campaign found that 1,236 pedestrians were killed on roads in Connecticut, New Jersey and downstate New York between 2010 and 2012.

Suffolk County’s Route 25, also known as Jericho Turnpike, is the region’s most dangerous road for pedestrians, according to the study. The groups said 16 people were killed in the three-year period.

As WCBS 880’s Sophia Hall reported, people are often seen trying to cross in the middle of the roadway to try to get to restaurants and stores.

“These sorts of characteristics that make the road deadly for pedestrians also makes an unsafe place for drivers and cyclists and transit users alike,” Veronica Vanterpool of the Tri-State Transportation Campaign told Hall.

The group noted improvements to help pedestrians have been made in Nassau County but not in Suffolk.

“In Nassau, what the department is doing is adding a series of raised center medians, more sidewalks, more crosswalks,” said Vanterpool.

There were 420 pedestrians killed on New York City streets between 2010 and 2012.

The most dangerous street is Broadway with nine pedestrian deaths, followed by Woodhaven Boulevard in Queens, Second Avenue in Manhattan and Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn, according to the study.

In Connecticut, 111 pedestrians were killed. US-1 was ranked the most dangerous with 11 deaths, the study showed.

In New Jersey, 442 pedestrians lost their lives. Burlington County’s US-130 is the Garden State’s most dangerous road  with 12 deaths in three years. Camden County’s US-30 and Middlesex County’s US-1 rounded out the state’s top three.

According to the study, most of the dangerous roads have a common thread – more than two lanes of traffic flowing in each direction with a speed limit of 40 miles per hour or higher and little pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure.

To see the full study, visit www.tstc.org.

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