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New Haven Mayor Wants Federal Funding For Help With Post-Storm Big Dig

Snow Plow (CBS 2)

Snow Plow (CBS 2)

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NEW HAVEN, Conn. (CBSNewYork) – As parts of Connecticut continue to dig out from the snowstorm, one city is asking federal assistance.

New Haven saw nearly 10 inches of snow during Thursday’s storm. Elsewhere in Connecticut, up to 16 inches of snow fell.

As WCBS 880 Connecticut Bureau Chief Fran Schneidau reported, crews in New Haven were running into difficulty clearing nearly 200 miles of city streets.

Mayor Toni Harp said some of the streets that were part of the original city are too narrow to accommodate plows.

She’s seeking federal funding to help clear the streets.

“It has snowed for over two weeks, on and off. And then to have a 24-hour snowstorm on top of that, we just have a lot of snow piled up,” Harp told Schneidau. “Worst case scenario, it will take a week.”

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The mayor praised residents who’ve helped pitch in to shovel off sidewalks or make coffee for snowplow drivers working around the clock.

“People have really acted like a community and have understood how mutually dependent we are on one another,” said Harp.

Schools in Bridgeport, Hartford and New Haven were among those closed again Friday.

Bradley International Airport north of Hartford reported nearly 30 flight cancellations Friday morning, while Metro-North reduced service to a Saturday schedule.

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy ordered non-essential, first-shift state employees to report to work an hour late Friday.

Several highway accidents have been reported.

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(TM and © Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)