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Mineola Law Places Limits On Driveway Shape And Size

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your home listical graphic Mineola Law Places Limits On Driveway Shape And Size

MINEOLA, N.Y. (CBSNewYork) – A Long Island village has established a ban on paved driveways that are too big.

Mineola officials said they’re trying to preserve the village’s suburban charm with a new ordinance that prohibits paved driveways from taking up more than 25 percent of a front yard, WCBS 880’s Mike Xirinachs reported. It does not apply to driveways on the side or back of homes.

Mineola Ordinance Prohibits Paved Driveways From Taking Up More Than 25 Percent Of Front Yard

photo 81 Mineola Law Places Limits On Driveway Shape And Size
Mike Xirinachs reports

The new law also prohibits circular driveways, 1010 WINS’ Mona Rivera reported.

Village officials said suburbia is supposed to have lawns, not concrete for front yards, Xirinachs reported.

Mineola Ordinance Prohibits Paved Driveways From Taking Up More Than 25 Percent Of Front Yard

photo 81 Mineola Law Places Limits On Driveway Shape And Size
Mona Rivera reports

Some residents disagree with the new paving law.

“It’s their property, they’re paying a lot of taxes,” one man said.

“There are probably more important things to worry about than that,” another man said.

Resident Harriet Beckman approves of the law, saying front yards shouldn’t look like parking lots.

“I don’t like the way they look,” Beckman said. “It starts to look like Queens after a while, I don’t want it to look like Queens, that’s not why I moved here.”

As CBS 2’s Jennifer McLogan reported, the Ferrieras called it a case of too much big brother.

“We need driveways. We pay taxes,” Ida Ferriera said.

The unanimous vote came as an increasing number of homeowners have tried to expand paved driveways, replace grass with concrete and cement, or install circular driveways.

Marilyn Gumpel called it paving paradise.

“This is too beautiful to destroy. It is just lovely living here,” she said.

Daniel Medford agreed and said that he backed the change to the village code.

“Instead of all concrete I want the grass, flowers, and plants,” he said.

Some said that they were it dismayed that it has become more common for children to live in their parents’ homes, and need space to park their cars.

“People’s needs change. More families, more kids, more cars. What are you going to do with all this parking?” Karen Garvey wondered.

The law was passed on June 11. The law applies to new construction only and does not affect existing driveways.

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