Yankees

Tom Seaver: Derek Jeter Should Be First Player Unanimously Elected To Hall

Derek Jeter (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

Derek Jeter (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

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NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — No player on the Hall of Fame ballot has ever received 100 percent of the votes.

Mets legend Tom Seaver holds the record for receiving the highest percentage — 98.84 percent in 1992 — and he just so happens to think that an active player can become the first in major-league history to be unanimously elected to the Hall.

And who would that active player be?

Yeah … you guessed it. Derek Jeter.

“I can’t see how he won’t be unless somebody beats him to the punch,” the three-time National League Cy Young Award winner told MLB.com’s Marty Noble.

But think of all the superstar players who didn’t receive 100 percent of the votes.

Babe Ruth. Willie Mays. Hank Aaron. Tony Gwynn. Frank Robinson. Cy Young. Ty Cobb. Sandy Koufax. The list goes on and on.

And most recently, Greg Maddux.

So what makes Jeter, playing in his final season, deserving?

“I’ve thought about it; Jeter should be the one,” Seaver told MLB.com. “What can you say he hasn’t done? He has every credential imaginable — great player, good citizen. He plays the game properly, respects the game and his predecessors. He’s done it in the big city, for one team that wears a uniform of greatness. He has no marks against him. He has the numbers. And he wins. He’s a class act all the way.

“A pro’s pro, a gentleman’s gentleman. If you’re starting a franchise, who do want as your first pick? I’ll take Jeter, thank you. And I’m sure I wouldn’t get too many arguments.”

Jeter’s numbers speak for themselves. An icon in New York sports, the shortstop is a 14-time All-Star, a five-time World Series champion — including the 2000 World Series MVP — a five-time Gold Glove Award winner, a five-time Silver Slugger Award winner and a two-time Hank Aaron Award winner.

The 40-year-old also owns a Rookie of the Year award, a Roberto Clemente Award and has been the Bombers’ captain since 2003.

Entering Friday night’s game he’s batting .270 with two homers and 27 RBIs.

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