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7 Ballparks That Are Better Than Yankee Stadium And Citi Field

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By Brad Kallet, WFAN.com
» More Columns

Citi Field and Yankee Stadium are beautiful parks, but they’re both missing something. The former is aesthetically pleasing, but it has no Mets feel. Sometimes when you’re there you need to be reminded that you’re at the home stadium of the Amazin’s. Where is the light blue and orange? Where is the energy? Where is the homage to former Mets greats?

As for the latter, it’s far too corporate. It doesn’t fill up, it’s not nearly as loud as the old Yankee Stadium and a certain buzz is missing. The history is gone and you no longer get goosebumps when you walk in the building.

So without further ado, here are seven major-league ballparks that are better — for a variety of reasons — than Citi Field and Yankee Stadium.

7. PNC Park

PNC Park (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)

PNC Park (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)

Pittsburgh might not be the most beautiful city in the union, but this park is something to behold. It’s as picturesque as it gets, and the Roberto Clemente Bridge in the background takes your breath away. Pirates fans are very passionate fans — see the Wild Card game last year — and this place can get quite rowdy.

6. Busch Stadium

Busch Stadium (Photo by David Welker/Getty Images)

Busch Stadium (Photo by David Welker/Getty Images)

Classic Americana. St. Louis is arguably the best baseball city in the U.S. — New York is right in that conversation — and going to Busch Stadium is a treat for any baseball fan. The fans are smart and loyal, and there is a certain Midwestern charm in the air.

5. Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Oriole Park at Camden Yards (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

Oriole Park at Camden Yards (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)

The warehouse in right field is awesome, and if you haven’t been to Camden Yards I urge you to head down to Baltimore and take it all in. Just don’t go when the Yankees are in town, because you’ll likely see the Bombers lose to the far-better Orioles.

4. Dodger Stadium

Dodger Stadium (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

Dodger Stadium (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)

Not the best-looking park on this list, Dodger Stadium is fantastic because it has an old-school feel to it and there are palm trees in the distance. A must-visit for any baseball diehard.

3. AT&T Park

AT&T Park (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

AT&T Park (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Maybe the most gorgeous park on the planet. It’s in remarkable San Francisco, so it has a leg up on the competition right off the bat. It’s also on the water, and if you haven’t gone after home-run balls in a kayak in McCovey Cove, I highly recommend that you do so at your earliest convenience. The massive glove and Coca-Cola sign earn it extra points, too.

2. Fenway Park

Fenway Park (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Fenway Park (Photo by Jared Wickerham/Getty Images)

Watch a game at this cathedral in Boston, and you’re suddenly transformed to 1920. You might as well be watching Ted Williams instead of David Ortiz. It feels like prohibition times. The seats are too small and you’re cramped, but it doesn’t matter. This is baseball at it’s finest, and despite being the oldest major-league park still being used (opened in 1912), it stands the test of time.

1. Wrigley Field

Wrigley Field (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

Wrigley Field (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)

The ivy. The neighborhood. The day games. The history. Wrigley Field, which opened just two years after Fenway, is the greatest park that still stands. You’re not a true baseball fan until you’ve taken in a game on West Addison Street.

Brad Kallet is an editor and columnist for CBSNewYork.com. He has written for TENNIS.com, MLB.com and SMASH Magazine, among others. You can follow him on Twitter @brad_kallet.

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