Soccer Injuries, Concussions Sending Soaring Number Of Kids To ERs

CHICAGO (CBSNewYork/AP) — Soccer injuries are sending soaring numbers of U.S. kids to emergency rooms, a trend driven in part by young players with concussions seeking urgent medical care, a study has found.

The findings, based on 25 years of data, partly reflect soccer’s growing popularity. But the researchers and sports medicine experts believe the trend also is a result of greater awareness about concussions and their potential risks. Coaches and parents are likely seeking emergency treatment for symptoms that in previous years might have been downplayed or overlooked.

As CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez explained, youth soccer participation has gone up 90 percent since 1990, and for the first time a study has gathered statistics on the injury rates that go along with so many players.

Nearly 3 million players aged 7 through 17 received ER treatment for soccer-related injuries in the 2000-2014 study. The overall rate of injuries, which takes into account soccer’s rising popularity, more than doubled to 220 per 10,000 players in 2013, from 106 per 10,000 players in 1990. Researchers did not have enough data to calculate 2014 rates.

More than 200,000 concussions or head injuries were treated in emergency rooms, or 7 percent of injuries. The rate jumped to almost 30 per 10,000 people in 2013 from just under 2 per 10,000 players in 1990.

The rate of injuries from playing soccer has ranked second behind football in other studies on youth sports, including an analysis of 2015-2016 data from Reporting Information Online, an internet-based injury surveillance system for high school sports.

For boys, football-related concussions result in more ER visits than other sports, according to previous research. For girls, it’s soccer, according to an analysis of 2001-2012 data by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The current study lacks information on gender-specific soccer injury rates.

Sprains and fractures were the most common injuries; most players were not hospitalized. Falling and getting hit by another player or the ball were among leading causes of injury but there’s no data in the study on whether many injuries were from heading the ball.

There are steps parents and coaches can take to help keep players safe.

“Make sure they participate in a pre-season conditioning program, make sure they’re warming up before every practice and every game, always wear your protective equipment like shin guards and mouthguards, and make sure you’re following all the rules,” Tracy Mehan, Nationwide Children’s Hospital explained.

It’s not clear how much of that advice players at the soccer pitch near Chelsea Piers on Monday, were following but they said serious injuries in their league were uncommon.

“Maybe a few bumps and bruises, but nothing too bad,” Amanda Smith said.

Concern about kids’ injuries from heading led to the U.S. Soccer Federation’s recent restrictions including a ban for kids aged 10 and younger and limits on heading for those aged 11-13.

Many concussions in soccer occur when heads collide as two players jump up to head the ball, said Dr. Cynthia LaBella, a sport medicine specialist at Chicago’s Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital. She said learning proper technique including tensing neck muscles can help kids avoid injury while heading the ball.

Labella noted that soccer has become so popular that it attracts kids with a wide range of athletic ability, and that many injuries she treats are in kids who lack adequate strength and conditioning for their soccer level.

“Everyone’s so eager to join the soccer team. They’re signing up because they want to be with their buddies,” she said. “The range of athleticism especially at the youth and preteen level is pretty broad.”

(TM and © Copyright 2016 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2016 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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