Cosby Shares Message For Jurors, Supporters Outside Courthouse On Day 5 Of Deliberations In Sex Assault Trial

NORRISTOWN, Pa. (CBSNewYork/AP) — The jury in comedian Bill Cosby’s sexual assault trial will return for its sixth day of deliberations Saturday.

Leaving the courthouse Friday night, Cosby spoke publicly for the first time since the case started.

“I want to thank the jury for their long days and their honest work. To the supporters, stay calm, do not argue with people,” he said.

Earlier in the day, the jury asked for a definition of reasonable doubt. The panel also asked to rehear parts of the 79-year-old comedian’s deposition testimony. He gave the deposition more than a decade ago as part of accuser Andrea Constand’s lawsuit against him.

Judge Steven O’Neill says defense lawyers have made at least four requests for a mistrial as the deliberations have worn on. But he says he’ll let the jurors work as long as they want.

“We’re prepared to go the distance. This is about him maintaining his innocence,” Andrew Wyatt, a spokesperson for Cosby, said.

Cosby thanked his fans and supporters as a the jury considers the charges that could send him to prison for the rest of his life.

Cosby tweeted the first message on Friday shortly after jurors asked to review his lurid testimony about giving quaaludes to women he wanted to have sex with. The 79-year-old TV star said in a 2006 deposition that he got seven prescriptions for the powerful sedative in the 1970s for the purpose of giving them to women before sex.

At around 4:40 p.m., he tweeted a thank with video of supporters outside the courthouse who could be heard chanting, “Free Bill Cosby.”

Cosby is charged with drugging and molesting a woman at his home in 2004. He has said he gave Benadryl to Andrea Constand before their sexual encounter. Prosecutors have suggested he might have given her quaaludes.

Cosby says his sexual encounter with Constand was consensual.

More than 50 other woman have also accused the comedian of sexual assault.

If the judge declares a mistrial, prosecutors would have four months to decide if they want to retry the case or drop the charges.

(© Copyright 2017 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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