NYU To Offer Classes On Occupy Movement; OWS Protesters Take On ‘Law & Order’

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — Don’t understand the Occupy Wall Street movement? Now, you can learn all about it.

New York University says it plans to offer two classes next semester on Occupy Wall Street through the school’s Department of Social and Cultural Analysis.

It will be called: “Why Occupy Wall Street? The History and Politics of Debt and Finance.”

Another professor will be teaching a graduate-level seminar on the demonstration.

Meanwhile, some OWS protesters took on television overnight, shutting down production of an episode of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.”

About 100 protesters arrived around midnight at Foley Square where the show was filming an episode with an “Occupy” theme.

On its website, Occupy called the “Law & Order” production “mockupy.”

Nearly 100 police officers appeared as the protesters roamed around the park, inspecting tents and signs built by the production company.

Protester Drew Hornbein of Brooklyn Heights said the movement is “not part of corporate TV America.”

Demonstrators cheered when an officer reportedly announced that the city has rescinded the film permit.

Arrests were threatened, but the crowd dispersed and the set was dismantled.

The movement is also calling for another day of action on Saturday. According to another Occupy website called dec10.takethesquare.net, the movement says “From East to West, North to South: on the 10th of December we will take to the streets and squares together to demand the fundamental principles that were promised and are inherent to the Human Beings.”

Back in November, 250 protesters were arrested during Occupy’s first day of action that came shortly after the movement’s encampment in Zuccotti Park was dismantled.

(TM and Copyright 2011 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2011 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

  • Nick

    And the idiots in NYU complain about how heavy their Student Loan Debt Load is. And they Need Help. Cut all welfare and let them starve to death already. It’s better for the human species going forward.

  • PaPa Joe

    This country’s future is what the people, not universities say it is. The occupiers are, obviously, a bunch of useless, worthless brigands whose time came and went. These folks are trying to hold on to what they had. If they can do that then they won’t have to acknowledge the fact that they are fools. Appologies to those few whose intentions were noble. Too bad you lost your cause to a bunch of bored, dangerous, worthless louts. To the sinceres, good luck and keep trying. Next time pay more attention to those with whom you associate.

  • mak

    GMAB. Of all the courses they could develop, NYU chooses OWS. So if this is a three credit course at the averaged cost of about $1,150 a credit, this will cost about $3,500 to learn about people who have don’t work, disrupt neighborhoods, are sketchy with their grooming habits, and yell about the evils of corporations, all while typing on their iPhones. It’s no wonder that people fear for this country’s future if this is what universities choose to offer our students.

    • Double-R

      I was going to make these same points but, you took the words right out of my mouth. Isn’t high college tuition and the cost of continuing education a part of what OWS is based around in the first place?

      if the problem here is how the rich are getting richer, while the working middle class tries to find jobs to put food on the table for the rest of their family, and the poor just struggles to live, why is this of all things going to be a class? Speaking as a college graduate, these 3-4 credit courses are no joke. They take the biggest bite out of your wallet.

      Ugh…I need a drink..

      • Double-R

        Things…hmm…I meant, this.

  • michaelfury
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