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Gov. Malloy: Connecticut Avoids ‘Big Snow Event,’ But Cold A Real Concern

Gov. Dan Malloy is seen at his inauguration - Hartford, CT - Jan 5, 2011 - Photo: Governor's Office

Gov. Dan Malloy is seen at his inauguration – Hartford, CT – Jan 5, 2011 – Photo: Governor’s Office

HARTFORD, Conn. (CBSNewYork/AP) — Connecticut dodged a bullet with this first winter storm of 2014.

It came in like a lion, but by noon on Friday it was out like a lamb and the dig-out began, CBS 2’s John Slattery reported.

By late morning, the plows and salt trucks had I-95 in Greenwich down to the pavement, and all lanes opens.

“Connecticut does a great job, maybe asuperb job. They don’t mess around,” said George Santizo of Byram.

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Gov. Dannel Malloy, speaking to WCBS 880 on Friday morning, said this storm paled in comparison to last February’s blizzard that dumped as much as 42 inches of snow on some communities.

“This was not a big snow event for us,” Malloy said.

According to the National Weather service, Darien got hit with the most snow in the state — 9.5 inches. WCBS 880 Connecticut Bureau Chief Fran Schneidau noted that people for the most part were hunkering down in the snow. One man was out walking his dog and a local gas station reported just two customers by mid-morning.

The state deployed about 630 trucks on the highways and an additional 200 contract trucks plowing and de-icing roadways, Malloy said.

The governor said closing down highways in advance helped prevent drivers getting stuck in snow drifts. Malloy said he’d not heard of any stranded cars as of Friday morning.

Connecticut government offices opened at 9:30 a.m. for non-essential state employees.

But the governor downplayed any excitement over the winter storm.

“You know what this is? It’s called winter,” Malloy told WCBS 880.

As the storm moved out of the area Friday the governor turned his concern toward the frigid temperatures, 1010 WINS reported.

“Our primary concern now through tomorrow remains the extreme cold — and with that the wind chill being a major factor.  We’ll have wind chills as low as 25 below, it is anticipated,” Malloy said.

The governor said the state’s severe cold weather protocol remains in effect, which allows state workers to reach out to individuals and make sure they are housed inside, 1010 WINS reported.

“Shelters throughout the state — these are the normal shelters that are operational to give services to those who are homeless — were operating at about 120 percent of capacity,” Malloy said.

Homeless shelters also extended their hours of operation Friday, allowing many people to remain in those shelters and out of the cold during daytime hours.

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