Government In Yemen In Danger Of Collapsing At The Hands Of Islamic Extremists


NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The terrorists believed to be behind the attack on a satirical newspaper in Paris traveled to Yemen for training. Now, the government in that country is on the verge of collapse and ISIS is again threatening to kill hostages.

The terror group released another video Tuesday, this time demanding a $2 million ransom in 72 hours for the release of two Japanese hostages, CBS2’s Dick Brennan reported Tuesday.

“To the prime minister of Japan: although you are more than 8,500 kilometers away from Islamic State, you willingly have volunteered to take part in this crusade,” the video says.

The Japanese prime minister insisted he would not give in to terrorism, but did not rule out paying the ransom.

The situation in Yemen, a hot bed for jihadi activism, is said to be deteriorating. Rebels have gained control of the presidential palace, and a Yemeni minister said the president has no control.

The palace is just a 20-minute drive from the U.S. embassy, near where an SUV carrying American diplomats was fired upon at a checkpoint. Nobody was hurt, but two U.S. Navy ships took up new positions in the Red Sea in case the embassy has to be evacuated.

In the meantime, there have been more terror raids across Europe.

A police spokesman said hundreds of German police officers launched more than a dozen raids Tuesday, mostly in Berlin and aimed at tracking down Islamist extremists.

In Belgium, paratroopers stood guard outside a Jewish school in Antwerp, fearing anti-Semitic terror attacks.

The military has become a highly visible presence.

“People feel it’s dangerous to walk on the street. People are afraid to come to synagogues, afraid to send their kids to Jewish school,” said Rabbi Menachem Margolin of the European Jewish Association.

In Paris, four men were facing charges in connection to killings at a Jewish supermarket earlier in January.

The Justice Department has charged two Yemeni nationals for allegedly targeting U.S. forces overseas. The suspected members of al Qaeda were arrested in Saudi Arabia and deported to the U.S., Brennan reported.

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