NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer says an audit by his office shows Animal Care & Control needs work.

“The findings would make your skin crawl,” Stringer told WCBS 880’s Jim Smith.

The report pointed to expired drugs being given to cats and dogs, vaccines being kept in the same refrigerator as frozen animal remains, poor ventilation systems and overcrowding.

“The audit I released shows that Animal Care & Control is putting our city’s stray and homeless animals at risk through shoddy and dangerous practices,” Stringer told WCBS 880. “How we treat animals is a reflection of our decency as a society.”

The comptroller said his office released the findings publicly with the hope of keeping AC&C accountable with public pressure.

“…to make it clear that this is unacceptable,” Stringer said.

Investigators said mismanagement within AC&C has made some animal sick, CBS2’s Steve Langford reported.

“We can certainly tell you what the causes of the complaints that we’ve continually received may be, because we can see concrete situations where rules weren’t followed and medical protocols were not followed,” said Deputy NYC Comptroller Marjorie Landa.

The audit made 18 recommendations to Animal Care & Control, which the non-profit and the city say have already been started on, 1010 WINS reported.

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Animal Care & Control issued a statement noting it has cooperated with the comptroller’s office throughout the audit and “was afforded an opportunity to meet with the audit team and provide comment and background on the report. AC&C has already undertaken steps to implement several of the recommendations in the Comptroller’s report, and will continue to strengthen our policies and procedures to ensure optimum performance and the best possible care for our animals.

“As the only open-admissions organization in the five boroughs, Animal Care & Control of NYC (AC&C) does not close its doors to any animal in need, and takes in more than 30,000 animals each year. Of the nearly 29,000 cats and dogs who came to AC&C in 2014, more than 21,000 were placed with adopters or partner organizations and more than 1,600 were returned to owner, resulting in a live release rate of 80.7%. (Detailed statistics are available on our website). We are committed to continual improvement, and are grateful to the City for recently announced capital funding that will, among other advances, allow us to build a new adoption center on the site of the Manhattan Care Center garage as well as update the HVAC system at our Brooklyn Care Center.”

Animal Care & Control is a non-profit contracted by the city and has shelters in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Staten Island.

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