NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — The federal corruption trial of former state Senate leader Dean Skelos is now in the final phase.

Deliberations started Thursday at the Manhattan trial of the Long Island Republican and his 33-year-old son, Adam Skelos. At the outset, jurors asked to rehear some wiretap and other secret recordings central to the case.

Both men are charged with eight counts of bribery, extortion and conspiracy.

Prosecutors say the elder Skelos used his position to strong arm companies into getting his son a “no show” job and other high-paying positions. They allege the 67-year-old also accepted hundreds of thousands of dollars from developers in exchange for political favors.

During the three-week trial, attorneys for Skelos and his son argued that no crime was ever committed.

The defense said in closing statements that Skelos never used his clout as one of Albany’s most powerful politicians to extort bribes consisting of $300,000 in salary and other benefits for his son.

As he entered court Wednesday, Adam Skelos made a swipe at the notorious three men in a room, CBS2’s Janelle Burrell reported. The term refers to the state Senate majority leader, the state Assembly majority leader and the governor — the most powerful politicians in the state who at one time were his father, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and former Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, who was convicted in his own corruption trial last week.

“Of the three men in the room that were running the state, two of them are crooked politicians. My dad’s not one of them,” Adam Skelos said.

As he exited court with his wife Wednesday, Dean Skelos reiterated confidence that he’ll be acquitted.

“The jury is working diligently, they’ve listened diligently, and I’m confident that my son and I are going to be found innocent,” he told reporters.

Skelos has retained his Senate seat but relinquished his leadership position.

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