NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Hundreds gathered for a unity vigil held Tuesday evening in Brooklyn to remember the 49 victims who were killed in an Orlando nightclub early Sunday morning.

As 1010 WINS’ Al Jones reported, it was a third night of messages of solidarity from New York to Orlando.

“He killed 49, but he attacked us all,” Councilman Brad Lander said.

The names of the 49 victims who died at the gay nightclub Pulse were read aloud.

“We are all here together as one family,” Councilman Carlos Menchaca said. “We must continue to join in solidarity.”

It was an evening of soft songs with guests that included a church choir and guest speakers who represent groups that include “Act Up,” “South Asian American Voices,” and “Latino Pride.”

At the north end of Prospect Park people gathered to hold candles, rainbow flags, and each other.

Jonathan Kimble said the shooting has put him on edge.

“I probably have a little bit of a something in the back of my head, just to like be careful, in the future,” he said.

CBS2’s Dave Carlin reported the Office of New York City’s public advocate organized this gathering with the hope that people of many different faiths will stand should-to-shoulder and remember those lost and work to build a better future.

“Once we show them, whoever they are that’s causing this hate crime with everybody, maybe sooner or later that whatever is going on, it’s not going to affect us,” Shane Pappad of Park Slope said.

“To see such hate, it’s very saddening,” Star Stone of Park Slope said.

Brian Buckman and Kathy Kolcun of Park Slope said their young daughter Nora had been asking them questions about the massacre, so they wanted her to be at the vigil and see it.

“For her to know that we live in a world where love can overcome hate, for her to be a part of that from the earliest part of her life, so it’s always a part of our life, is important thing for us,” Kolcun said.

Some of those in attendance took part in another gathering right before this one across the Brooklyn Bridge creating a so-called “rainbow connection.” Marchers wore a variety of solid colored shirts to create that rainbow effect. 

Vacationers and resident’s of Fire Island’s gay communities expressed sadness and anger over the attack, but showed little fear of more anti-gay violence, WCBS 880’s Mike Xirinachs said.

“I don’t think that way,” one man said. “I have complete sorrow for the loss of those lives and their families.”

A separate vigil was held in Jersey City, where LGBT community leaders joined hundreds in a ceremony to mourn and show the world the city stands with Orlando.

On Monday, a vigil was held in front of Stonewall Inn that was attended by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio.