NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — Demonstrators protesting against the shootings of black men by police officers are using silence to make their point.

The crowd of about 300 people started in Times Square on Sunday. Between short speeches, they stood silently, holding signs saying “Black Lives Matter.” Some had their fists in the air.

They left in a silent march, making their way south to Bryant Park and then to Herald Square. At Bryant Park, young children who had been brought to the march were showcased as the lives demonstrators were marching to protect.

Jashaun Sadler of Ridgefield Park, New Jersey, brought his 6-year-old twins to the demonstration. He says it’s “unspeakable” to think of them growing up in a world “where their skin color could make the difference between life and death.”

CBS2’s Magdalena Doris reported the NYPD arrested 20 protesters throughout the city Saturday when the demonstrations became dangerous.

The FDR Drive was shut down by protesters as they made it onto major roads.

“People here are fighting for justice for all in a country that promises it,” one protester said.

The fight against police brutality could be seen throughout the area and across the country overnight.

“If only black lives did matter, we wouldn’t have to say it,” one protester remarked.

The family of Delrawn Small, who was killed last week by an off-duty officer in Brooklyn, was calling for reform in the criminal justice system.

“It’s not about me, it’s not about any of us as individuals,” Zayanahla Vines, Small’s newphew, said. “It’s about us, what’s going on with my people, our people. It needs to stop, something needs to change.”

Those marching have been moved to do so by the very public deaths of Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, and Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

This is the fourth day of protests in New York City.

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