NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Commuting is stressful enough, but imagine walking along the subway platform through fresh paint, and all that goes with that.

People took to social media pointing out repainting work on the yellow track-side edge of the Rockaway Ave. C train station’s platform in Bed-Stuy.

It’s already messed up with shoe prints.

Josh Boerman says that’s because transit workers were painting yellow lines Wednesday morning at 9:30 a.m., and there were no signs warning anyone.

“Someone just put down a fresh coat of yellow paint on the subway platform edge… at 9:30 on a Wednesday morning,” he wrote on Twitter. “This platform is going to be a mess of yellow footprints by the end of the day. What is going on.”

“People just don’t think. They’re not thinking about the consequences their decisions are going to have, and we’ve ended up with a transit system that reflects those priorities,” he told CBS2’s Cindy Hsu. “It’s incredibly frustrating.

Sure enough, just a few minutes later, new posts from inside a train showed the result.

Boerman says this wasn’t the only stop where this was happening. He says transit workers were also painting yellow lines at the next stop, Ralph Avenue.

“No, that’s totally unacceptable. I mean, it doesn’t take much. Normally, they have someone out her letting you know that something is going on,” said subway rider Tracy Hearn.

“Caution sign, or some tape. Or they should have just closed it down until it was able to dry,” said subway rider Celeste Brown. “What’s going with the transit… it’s really not surprising to me as much anymore.”

“It’s a hazard by me. Being a nursing aide, I think it’s very hazardous for people to walk through wet paint, because they’re asking for a lawsuit,” said subway rider Rosezena Brown-Matos. “They can slip through it, they can fall, they can fall on the track. There’s so much going on.”

So who’s bright idea was this? Could it have been done overnight or during a quieter time?

“We successfully do paint work day in and day out at our 472 stations without any issues whatsoever,” the MTA said in a statement. “This is an extremely rare example of very humid weather slowing the drying process after off-hours work and extra care will be taken to make sure it doesn’t happen again.”