NEW YORK (CBSNewYork)Mayor Bill de Blasio on Tuesday unveiled a new plan as part of his “Vision Zero” campaign aimed at ending traffic deaths and injuries in New York City.

Watch: Mayor De Blasio Makes Vision Zero Announcement

New York City will now target 424 miles of streets where nearly half of all pedestrian fatalities occur.

Traffic signal timing will be modified to reduce speeding along new “priority corridors” by the end of this year.

Pedestrians will also get lead time to cross at 300 intersections throughout the five boroughs.

(credit: NYC.gov)

The targeted “priority corridors” are:

  • Bronx: Westchester Avenue (3rd Avenue to Bronx River Avenue), Boston Road – 3rd Avenue to Bronx Park East, Soundview Avenue – (White Plains Road to Bruckner Boulevard)
  • Brooklyn: Linden Blvd (Flatbush Av to Sapphire St), 8th Avenue – (39th Street to 73rd Street), Surf Avenue – (Ocean Parkway to Atlantic Avenue), Bedford Avenue – (Manhattan Avenue to Flatbush Avenue).
  • Manhattan: Columbus Avenue (9th Avenue to Morningside Drive), York Avenue – (Sutton Place to the FDR), 10th Avenue (West Street to 59th Street)
  • Queens: Rockaway Boulevard (Eldert Lane to 3rd Street), 37th Avenue – (114th Street to Woodside Avenue), 21st Street (50th Avenue to 20th Avenue)
  • Staten Island: Targee Street – (Van Duzer Street to Richmond Road), Bradley Avenue – (Watchogue Rd to Brielle Avenue), Lincoln Avenue – (Richmond Road to Father Capodanno Boulevard)

The plan builds upon already upgraded corridors like Baychester Avenue near 223rd Street, where a pedestrian island was created. Expanded pedestrian islands on Bushwick Avenue and Linden Boulevard in Brooklyn.

The NYPD says one of the leading causes of pedestrian crashes are cars cutting the corner, making left turns. The department also reminds everyone that pedestrians have a responsibility, too.

“I have a request of all New Yorkers, don’t text while in an intersection,” de Blasio said on Tuesday.

2018 was the safest year in a century, according to the mayor, however in the first few weeks of 2019 there have been seven more fatalities compared to last year.

The changes announced on Tuesday will take effect over the next few years.