NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — If you think your kid has a lot of Legos, the New York Hall of Science has you beat.

The Lego artwork exhibit “The Art of the Brick” will be on display at the New York Hall of Science from Sept. 28, 2019, to Jan. 26, 2020. (Credit: John Dias/CBS2)

READ MORE: TIMELINE: Nor'easter Could Bring More Than A Foot Of Snow To Long Island & Jersey Shore; Up To 8 Inches To NYC

Starting Saturday, they will open a Lego exhibit that holds a spot in the world records book.

Brick artist Nathan Sawaya is bringing his world-renowned exhibit “The Art of the Brick” to Queens. It features more than 100 sculptures, the world’s largest display of Lego art.

“As an artist, I hope people are inspired. I think that’s the role of artists. So for me, I want people to come, see this exhibition and hopefully be inspired to explore a little more creativity in their own lives,” Sawaya said.

Sawaya put every last one together, using just his two hands and glue.

PHOTO GALLERY: Lego Exhibit On Display At New York Hall Of Science

Creating the exhibition was a massive task. Sawaya needed more than 1 million Lego bricks.

His Lego recreation of the Venus de Milo took 18,000 bricks. The Mona Lisa is about 4,000 pieces.

For those art history replicas and many others, Sawaya does extensive research.

“I have a lot of photos of the original laid out,” he said.

READ MORE: Nor'easter Triggers Blizzard Warning In Suffolk County, As New York Braces For Widespread Snowfall

When it comes to his original pieces, he lets his creativity roam, unafraid of restarting.

“As I’m building, I’m actually gluing as I go, so each individual brick, I have to put a little bit of glue down, and if I make a mistake, that means I get a hammer and chisel and have to break it apart,” Sawaya said.

The Lego artwork exhibit “The Art of the Brick” will be on display at the New York Hall of Science from Sept. 28, 2019, to Jan. 26, 2020. (Credit: John Dias/CBS2)

While some smaller pieces take only a few days to complete, others take weeks.

A 20 foot long T. rex required 80,000 Lego bricks and, Sawaya says, “three months of non-stop every day working.”

Sawaya says he has to buy every last Lego himself. The good thing is he gets to buy it in bulk.

His exhibit has traveled to every continent. The New York Hall of Science fought hard to get it.

“Every experience that we put on here, day in and day out, is about giving you a chance to find that bit of creative spark,” said Dan Wempa, COO of the New York Hall of Science.

Creativity that you can find in every Lego Brick.

“The Art of the Brick” will be on display from Sept. 28 to Jan. 26.

MORE NEWS: Some Women Suffering From Long COVID Say Extreme Hair Loss Is Among Symptoms

For more information on the exhibit, including hours and ticket prices, click here: nysci.org/event/art-of-the-brick.