NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – With no end in sight to the hunger crisis, food funders do their best to meet a growing need.

While some call on the government to do more, others are stepping in to help.

Boxes and bags of food were piled high in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, to feed the hungry Wednesday.

“I’m 72 years old, I can’t find a job and these times are very hard for me,” one woman said.

She believes she would be homeless if not for the generosity of Catholic Charities Brooklyn & Queens.

RELATED STORY: Citymeals On Wheels Says Food Is Going Fast And It Needs More Donations And Volunteers

“People are still hurting out there, and they still need that support,” said Richard Slizeski, senior vice president of mission for Catholic Charities Brooklyn & Queens.

Volunteers in costume handed out essentials, plus Halloween goodies like pumpkins, to those in need at a harvest food pop-up in Brooklyn on Oct. 28, 2020. (Credit: CBS2)

Slizeski says there’s a food pantry outside of Our Lady of Angels regularly, but Wednesday’s was special.

It was the Halloween harvest food pop-up. Volunteers in costume handed out essentials.

“We wanted to do something extra special this time,” Slizeski said. “It’s about 20 pounds of food they’re getting, as well they’re going to get some pumpkins and a little festivity too.”

“The line goes all around the block to the other side, so it’s a lot of people in need,” one woman said.

Collecting there helps.

Organizers expected to treat about 1,000 families during Wednesday’s event.

They’re hosting a pop-up in East New York Friday. For more information about that, CLICK HERE.

RELATED STORY: Food Banks In Growing Need Of Donations As New Families Experience Food Insecurity During Pandemic

In Woodside, Queens, there was a rallying cry for the government to do more.

“Where is the support? Where is the funding?” said Jonathan Forgash, co-founder and executive director of Queens Together.

“While resources and funds continue to diminish, the need for sustenance has not,” said Judy Zangwill, executive director of Sunnyside Community Services.

(credit: CBS2)

There was proof across the street as folks waited for hours for fresh food.

“Families are out here, seniors are out here, no matter what, lining up for the food,” said Diane Adlam, director of Sunnyside/Woodside Community Center.

“We believe the need is going to continue to grow,” said Jenique Jones, senior director of program operations and policy at City Harvest.

CBS2’s Vanessa Murdock asked Jones if food banks across the city are positioned to meet the still-growing need for food as we enter the holiday season.

“I think we’re positioned to do our absolute possible best,” she said.

But she adds more should be done by everyone able.

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